OpenStack Ideas

I’ve written several blog posts about my ideas for improving OpenStack, with a particular emphasis on the Nova Scheduler. This week at the OpenStack Summit in Austin, there were two other proposals put forth. So at least I’m not the only one thinking about this stuff!

At the Tuesday keynote, Intel demonstrated a version of OpenStack that was completely re-written in Go. They demonstrated creating 10,000 containers and 5,000 VMs in under a minute. Pretty impressive, right? Well, yeah, except they gave no idea of what parts of Nova were supported, and what was left out. How were all those VMs scheduled? What sort of logging was done to help operators diagnose their sites? None of this was shown or even discussed. It didn’t seem to be a serious proposal for moving OpenStack forward; instead, it seemed that it was a demo with a lot of sizzle designed to simply wake up a dormant community, and make people think that Intel has the keys to our future. But for me, the question was always the same one I deal with when I’m thinking about these matters: how do you get from the current OpenStack to what they were showing? Something tells me that rather than being a path forward, this represents a brand-new project, with no way for existing deployments to migrate without starting all over. So yeah, kudos on the demo, but I didn’t see anything directly useful in it. Of course Go would be faster for concurrent tasks; that’s what the language was designed for!

The other project was presented by a team of researchers from Inria in France who are aiming to build a massively-distributed cloud with OpenStack. Instead of starting from scratch as Intel did, they instead created a driver for oslo.db that mimicked SQLAlchemy, and used Redis as the datastore. It’s ironic, since the first iteration of Nova used Redis, and it was felt back then that Redis wasn’t up to the task, so it was replaced by MySQL. (Side note: some of my first commits were for removing Redis from Nova!) And being researchers, they meticulously measured the performance, and when sites were distributed, over 80% of the queries performed better than with MySQL. This is an interesting project that I intend on following in the future, as it actually has a chance of ever becoming part of OpenStack, unlike the Intel project.

I still hold out hope that one day we can free ourselves of the constraints of having to fit all resources that OpenStack will ever have to deal with into a static SQL model, but until then, I’m happy with whatever incremental improvements we can make. It was obvious from this Summit that there are a lot of very smart people thinking about these issues, too, and that fills me with hope for the long-term health of OpenStack.

2 thoughts on “OpenStack Ideas”

  1. Hi Ed
    One of my peers found you post regarding Intel project, actually its name is CIAO, you could add references to documentation as follows:

    In the above link you will find documentation, github repo and more.
    I work with the guys developing CIAO, in case you want to reach for any question send me a mail. (

  2. The point of CIAO (the Intel project) wasn’t the language; the language gives you a nice 20% boost but that’s not nearly enough. The point of CIAO was to prototype somewhat different architectural ideas, to gain at least a 10x performance increase. That goal got exceeded by quite a bit, and as a result, the CIAO team (disclaimer: I’m one of the leads for that project) is going to apply for Big Tent inclusion.

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