OpenStack Nova Mid-cycle Meetup, Day 3

The final day of the mid-cycle meetup started with some discussions about a few various issues. The first was regarding recent versions of libvirt not working well in our CI infrastructure, and the efforts to package these for Fedora, Ubuntu, and CentOS. The next, and somewhat more interesting (since I know very little about our CI infrastructure), was the discussion about EC2 API support in OpenStack. I found myself experiencing déjà vu, as this was so similar to the discussions about EC2 support in the early days of OpenStack: a few vocal people claimed that it was critical, but nobody seemed to feel that it was important enough to put in the time to maintain it properly. The consensus was that we should deprecate the EC2 API in Kilo, and remove it as soon as the L release. While a few people thought that this was a bit drastic, the truth is that the EC2 stuff hasn’t worked well since Folsom – hell, it had barely worked since the Cactus release. One bright spot for EC2 fans is that there is a project on StackForge to implement the EC2 API in a separate code base; this can be developed independent of the Nova source tree, and if it succeeds, great, but if it withers on the vine, Nova will not be stuck with a bunch of useless EC2 cruft in its code.

Bugs! We’ve climbed back up over 1,000 active bugs, and that’s certainly a cause for concern. Many of these, however, are considered trivial: not because the bug isn’t important, but because the fix is only a couple of changed lines with little possibility of impacting other parts of the code. There had been a plan to label these bugs so that core reviewers could find them easier and help reduce the overall load, but this seems to have lost momentum since the last release. So we asked a few people to volunteer to become “Trivial Patch Monkeys”, whose job it will be to regularly devote some of their time to going over the bug list to identify these trivial fixes. So far there are 6 monkeys… um, I mean, volunteers.

The last part of the morning was spent discussing the Feature Freeze Exception process for Kilo. The goal is to not only reduce the number of FFEs, but to get them to zero. Why is this so important? Well, adding new code so late in the cycle takes a lot of the time that Nova core reviewers have, so if we can keep that to a minimum (zero is a nice minimum!), it would free up the cores to review and merge as many bug fixes as possible before the release. It would also help people realize that FFEs are supposed to be very rare, and that it should truly require some unusual circumstance to be granted.

I couldn’t stay for the afternoon session, because I had to leave for the airport for my return flight home. I was very glad to have been able to participate in this event, as I learned an awful lot about some of the current intricacies of the project, which have grown considerably since the days when I was a core reviewer for Nova. It was also great to see some of the faces I first met at the Paris Summit again, and develop a deeper working relationship with them. So, until Vancouver

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